Ten Green Tips to Save Some “Green” as You As You Wear the Green

With St. Patty’s Day fast approaching it won’t be too long until you until are able to get outside to your own little patch of green.  Here are a few tips to make your green even greener.

  1. Tear out some lawn

    Help reduce some of our vast suburban monoculture by removing some of your lawn and planting a garden. Manicured, tended lawns, though beautiful, provide very little habitat for wildlife. And, BTW, your lawns don’t have to be perfect! (see #4 below) An array of green plants in your lawn is perfectly fine.

  2. Create a rain garden

    Plant a rain garden near a downspout to intercept roof runoff.   It will help to slow the flood of storm water, reduce erosion, and absorb pollutants.  Check out the Rutgers Rain Garden Manual or call the Master Gardeners of Mercer County for more info.

  3. Plant a native plant garden

    The birds, bees and butterflies will also repay your hard work by appearing regularly and pollinating your landscape.  And then enjoy the fun of watching wildlife up close. Doug Tallamy’s books are great resources: see The Living Landscape and Bringing Nature Home at Mercer County Library.

  4. Eliminate chemical usage in your yard

    Please, please, please eschew the chemical insecticides and pesticides and herbicides on your property. Not only are these practices lethal to wildlife but it also ends up in your drinking water and our oceans.

  5. Compost!!!

    Start a compost bin in your yard. This is a great way to recycle vegetable and fruit scraps, along with the yard debris. Compost is nature’s gold and you can use it to feed your property the natural way and eliminate those nasty chemicals in the environment.

  6. Apply mulch, more mulch and yet more mulch…

    Your gardens will benefit from the application of mulch in your beds. Lay mulch 2 – 3” deep and allow breathing room around the base of the plants. Mulch will help keep your plantings moist, so you won’t have to water as frequently in dry spells. It will also decompose and add nutrients to your soil.

  7. Tip for Mulching trees

    Although it might seem from Tip 6 that there is no such thing as too much mulch, in actuality, improper mulching can be harmful and you see it all the time around area trees.  Do NOT pile up mulch around the base of your trees. Mulch softens the bark. Mice, insects, and fungus then feed on the living parts of the tree, killing tissue, cutting off water and nutrient supply as well as causing other serious problems that can greatly damage and kill a tree.

  8. Plant a vegetable garden this year!

    Nothing is greener than growing your own healthy, chemical free vegetables. Start some seeds now if you haven’t already and you will soon be ready to move them outside when the snow finally melts and the weather warms.

  9. Use water wisely

    There are a number of things that you can do to reduce your property’s water usage. These include mulching, planting natives, only irrigating when necessary, and harvesting rainwater with rain barrels. If you must irrigate, water your lawns and gardens in the morning to minimize evaporation.

  10. Join the Ewing Community Gardens

    Ewing residents, if you don’t have a large enough property or enough sun, don’t fret. Join the Ewing Community Gardens on Whitehead Rd. Extension. Each plot is approximately 20’ x 16’ and costs $5 for the season. Newcomers to the Gardens can purchase two beginning on March 16th at the Township Clerk’s office. The site boasts a number of amenities including deer fencing, a water supply, a port-a-john, and the companionship of like-minded gardening enthusiasts. For more information contact the Ewing Community Gardens Association at ewingcommunitygardens@gmail.com.

Feel free to add to our suggestions!

raking autumn leaves

“Leaf Cycling” Is the Eco-Friendly Way to Maintain Your Yard

Leaf Your Leaves in Your Yard!

 Every fall there’s a certain amount of cringing going on during my trips around town when I see  bags or piles of leaves out at the curb – all of that wonderful organic material that could be used to recharge your yards just tossed away!  So this is a prime opportunity to discuss the best way to handle your leaf cleanup at the end of the gardening season. I can’t urge you strongly enough not to give your leaves away!  It is a huge waste of natural materials that could benefit your yard! There are a number of really simple environmentally friendly ways to handle your leaf drop that don’t starve your yard and also decrease your impact on municipal services to save $$$.

So what to do with those leaves?

The first method is the lazy man’s way (my favorite) and involves very little raking and effort on your part. Simply run your lawn mower over the leaves where they lie and chop them up into small pieces.  (Yes, I know that using gas mowers are considered an unsustainable gardening practice, but consider the greater good.)  The chopped leaves can stay on your lawn and decompose there. This is an excellent way to help build up the soil. This works best with a mulching mower which is meant to chop materials (you do grass cycle, don’t you?) into fairly small pieces. Do this as needed until the end of the season and the leaves will break down over the winter providing your soil with valuable nutrients. You won’t have to rake a single leaf, and your lawn will thank you for it with improved performance next year.  Check out the video below to see how easy it is.

Another method not quite so effortless is taking those chopped up leaves and mulching your garden beds with them. This will protect your plants from the vagaries of the winter weather and also provide your beds with valuable nutrients when the leaves break down.

If you run out of time (or energy) you can forgo the chopping with the mower and leave the leaves in the beds where they fall and pile on more.  This will accomplish two necessary tasks.  (1) Removing your leaves from any hard surfaces on your property where they can become slick and messy. And (2) removing those leaves from your lawn where they can smother the turf grass.  This also will provide for a neater end of the year appearance.  Research does show that most garden plants in the colder hardiness zones appreciate a nice cover of leaves to protect them, however there are a few that do not so you need to be aware of your specific plant needs.  If you mulch with unchopped leaves, you are also faced with the issue of cleanup in the spring because most leaves will not have decomposed by that time.  If you trees have fine leaves you can probably leave them be in the spring and the appearance will not suffer unduly.  However, many of us are blessed with fine old trees like oaks, maples and sycamores, etc. that have large leaves and for a groomed appearance in your beds in spring you are going to have to remove them.  [I find myself hard at work every spring removing leaves, chopping, and then returning them back into the beds as mulch.  I never said that gardening doesn’t have its chores.]

You can also add your leaves to your compost pile. No matter how small your yard there is always room for a small one tucked away in some out of the way place. The leaves will decompose more quickly if you chop them with your lawn mower as recommended above. Then gather them up (it’s amazing how a large pile of leaves reduces in size) and add them to the pile. If your pile is composed only of chopped leaves, you can make leaf mold for use at a later time. If you have green debris from your garden you can mix the two in layers and let it sit over the winter. Turn the pile when the weather permits and you will eventually have the Black Gold of the garden world – compost.

I tend to use a combination of all these methods.  When it is not too late (or cold) I happily run my lawn mower over piles of leaves that have fallen on the lawn and that I have removed from the beds.  Since raking afterwards is not 100% perfect, some is left on the lawn after I have either blown or raked the chopped product into the beds or put in the compost pile.  However, as the season winds down and I find myself beset with end of the year chores, one of the final acts of the season is that last pass with the lawnmower where I leave the leaves in place.  The yard is then as neat as I can get it before I retreat from the garden and await the first snow.

So I encourage you to avail yourselves of the multifold benefits of leaf hoarding.  Your yard will thank you for it.

by Joanne Mullowney, dedicated leaf hoarder.

Mow and Go: Grasscycling Update

The Ewing Green Team once again invites all Ewing residents to help create a greener Ewing through grasscycling.  So what exactly is grasscycling? It sounds like you should be putting your clippings out at the curb with the rest of the recycling, right?  In fact, that is not the case at all.  Grasscycling is the natural recycling of grass by leaving clippings on the lawn when mowing.  They should not be bagged for curb disposal.  Grasscycling reduces the amount of materials in your household trash and at the same time creates a valuable natural resource that will break down naturally and fertilize your lawn.   It’s simple, easy, saves time, money and energy.  Take a look at the following video to see how easy it is.  Then read the rest of this post below if you have any additional questions.

Benefits

When you leave your grass clippings on your lawn to decompose; it acts as a natural organic fertilizer supplying half of the nitrogen your lawn needs to thrive. Clippings, which are 80% water, settle between the blades of grass where they shelter the roots from the sun – conserving moisture. They also cool the roots and block weed growth.  Your lawn will remain healthy and green because each time you mow; you will return valuable nutrients to the soil and ultimately need to water less frequently.

Grasscycling begins with proper mowing

To maintain your lawn properly, mow high and mow often, so that you never take off more than 1/3 of the length of the grass. This will result in an attractive, neatly trimmed lawn.  Keep grass mowed to 2” in early spring, gradually raise the height to 3-4” by summer, then gradually reduce to 2” by late fall.

You don’t have to go out to buy a new mower. While most new mowers are mulching mowers; you can attach mulching equipment to your existing mower. Just remove the grass catcher. Ask your lawn mower dealer if you need a special safety plug or adapter kit to convert your mower into a ‘recycling’ mower; installing a mulching blade also is helpful.

Alternatives

There are times when grasscycling does not work. Prolonged wet weather, mower breakdowns, or infrequent mowing are situations where the large number of grass clippings should probably be collected. Add those clippings to your compost pile or use them as mulch around trees, flower beds, and shrubs.  The addition of this organic matter will ultimately improve your soil; sandy soils will retain more water and heavy clay soils will become more productive.

So Why Grasscycle?

So grasscycle for a healthy green lawn; to save a lot of green; and to be environmentally green.  Take advantage of the beneficial organic matter it adds to the soil making it greener and healthier, crowding out weeds and reducing the need for fertilizer.  Save time and effort by eliminating the bagging, raking and disposing of grass clippings.  And finally, help the environment by reducing water and fertilizer requirements and reducing toxic runoff entering storm drains and polluting creeks and rivers.  It’s the ‘green’ thing to do.

Take Our GrassCycle Pledge

Grasscycling: a Greener Lawn the Greener Way

The Ewing Green Team invites all Ewing residents to join our campaign for a greener Ewing through grasscycling.  Grasscycling is the natural recycling of grass by leaving clippings on the lawn when mowing.  Figures show that grass disposal may account for 10-20% of New Jersey’s municipal solid waste stream. With the high cost of waste disposal and limited space in landfills; we can no longer afford to dispose of grass clippings in the household trash and at the same time waste a critical natural resource.   The simple solution is actually the best solution. Grow a healthy lawn just by leaving grass clippings as you mow your lawn. It’s simple, easy, saves time, money and energy.

The Benefits

When you leave your grass clippings on your lawn to decompose; it acts as a natural organic fertilizer supplying half of the nitrogen your lawn needs to thrive. Clippings, which are 80% water, settle between the blades of grass where they shelter the roots from the sun – conserving moisture. They also cool the roots and block weed growth.  Your lawn will remain healthy and green because each time you mow; you will return valuable nutrients to the soil and ultimately need to water less frequently.

Grasscycling begins with proper mowing

To maintain your lawn properly, mow high and mow often, so that you never take off more than 1/3 of the length of the grass. This will result in an attractive, neatly trimmed lawn.  Keep grass mowed to 2” in early spring, gradually raise the height to 3-4” by summer, then gradually reduce to 2” by late fall.

You don’t have to go out to buy a new mower. While most new mowers are mulching mowers; you can attach mulching equipment to your existing mower. Just remove the grass catcher. Ask your lawn mower dealer if you need a special safety plug or adapter kit to convert your mower into a ‘recycling’ mower; installing a mulching blade also is helpful.

Alternatives

There are times when grasscycling does not work. Prolonged wet weather, mower breakdowns, or infrequent mowing are situations where the large number of grass clippings should probably be collected. Add those clippings to your compost pile or use them as mulch around trees, flower beds, and shrubs.  The addition of this organic matter will ultimately improve your soil; sandy soils will retain more water and heavy clay soils will become more productive.

So Why Grasscycle?

So grasscycle for a healthy green lawn; to save a lot of green; and to be environmentally green.  Take advantage of the beneficial organic matter it adds to the soil making it greener and healthier, crowding out weeds and reducing the need for fertilizer.  Save time and effort by eliminating the bagging, raking and disposing of grass clippings.  And finally, help the environment by reducing water and fertilizer requirements and reducing toxic runoff entering storm drains and polluting creeks and rivers.  It’s the ‘green’ thing to do.

Take Our GrassCycle Pledge