Recycling Double Header This Saturday, Oct 22nd

Join the EGT for a recycling double-header this Saturday, October 22nd! Two recycling events are scheduled for the day which will help you to green your lifestyles thru recycling, the final 2016 Shred Day, and the biannual Rx Take Back Day.

You may dispose of your sensitive documents safely and securely at Ewing’s final Shred Day of the year from 9 – 1 at the municipal building. Document shredding will be done on site. This service is for Ewing residents only and proof of residency is required.

Members of the Ewing Green Team will be on hand to assist.

Date: Saturday, October 22nd
Time: 9 a.m. – 1 p.m.
Location: Municipal Building, 2 Jake Garzio Drive


drugsIf your medicine cabinet is filled with expired drugs or medications that you no longer use, and you are concerned about detrimental environmental effects from improper disposal, here is the information that you need to properly dispose of them.

The Ewing Police Department will be participating in the DEA’s twice yearly National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day which will take place on Saturday, October 22, 2016, from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. This is a great opportunity for those who missed the previous events, or who have subsequently accumulated unwanted, unused prescription drugs, to safely dispose of those medications.  Just go to the Ewing Police Department at 2 Jake Garzio Drive.  Enter the main door and make a left to go down the hallway to the Police Department.  Ewing Police will have an officer between 10 and 2 to take the items.

All medications are accepted, prescription and over-the-counter, as well as liquids.  Hypodermic needles are not accepted.  The disposal is handled completely securely; all accepted medications with any labels that you leave on the containers are placed in a large cardboard box, lined with plastic.  At the end of the day the contents are taken to the prosecutor’s office.  The DEA will pick up and incinerate.

National Take Back Day Information

Date: Saturday, October 22nd
Time: 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.
Location: Ewing Police Department, 2 Jake Garzio Drive

Trifecta of “Green” Events This Saturday, Oct 24th

It’s going to busy a busy day in town this Saturday for those who wish to join in with the EGT to green their lifestyles just a bit.   Three events are running which will help you to do so, the Ewing Fall Spin, the final 2015 Shred Day, and the EGT’s 2nd Annual Scarecrow Contest.

fallspinlogo4The Fall Spin, Ewing’s First ever Bike Tour organized to promote  a more bikeable Ewing, will start at the ESCC at 8 a.m. Participants will ride out promptly at 9 to complete an 11 mile journey through the western section of town.  Riders will have a police escort and there will be a number of stops at points of interest as well as a rest stop at the River Horse Brewery.  (So sorry, but you will have to return after the ride for one of their excellent tours and tastings).   The fee is $20.  That covers the cost of tee-shirts (if available).  If there are insufficient tee-shirts left, we will arrange for you to receive one after the day.

Date: Saturday, October 24th
Time: 8 a.m. – 11 a.m.
Location: Ewing Senior and Community Center, 999 Lower Ferry Rd.


You may also dispose of your sensitive documents safely and securely at Ewing’s final Shred Day of the year, Saturday, Oct 24th from 9 – 1 at the municipal building.  Document shredding will be done on site.  This service is for Ewing residents only and proof of residency is required.

Members of the Ewing Green Team will be on hand to assist.

Date: Saturday, October 24th
Time: 9 a.m. – 1 p.m.
Location: Municipal Building


scarecrow3We will finish up the day with our 2nd Annual Scarecrow Contest.    The Scarecrows will be on display at the Ewing Community Center at 999 Lower Ferry Road starting Friday, October23rd. The judging and awarding of cash prizes of $100, $50 and $25 will be during Ewing’s Fall Festival of Fun which includes, a fun ‘Trunk or Treat’, make your own life-size scarecrows to decorate your yard, pumpkin painting, face painting and refreshments.

The day’s event is a joint collaboration with the Ewing Arts Commission; they organize the popular annual ‘Trunk or Treat’ and help judge the Scarecrow Contest along with Mayor Bert Steinmann.

Members of the Ewing High School Arts Club will offer the pumpkin painting and face painting.

The event is from 2:00-4:00 pm and is a wonderful opportunity for residents of Ewing to get together and celebrate the fall season.

Date: Saturday, October 24th
Time: 2 p.m. – 4 p.m..
Location: Ewing Senior and Community Center [ESCC]

So join us at one or all events – on our Bike Tour, Shred  3 for 2015, and the Festival of Fun/Scarecrow contest and help us to promote healthy lifestyles, a more bikeable Ewing,  as well as furthering both recycling efforts in town and the arts.

raking autumn leaves

“Leaf Cycling” Is the Eco-Friendly Way to Maintain Your Yard

Leaf Your Leaves in Your Yard!

 Every fall there’s a certain amount of cringing going on during my trips around town when I see  bags or piles of leaves out at the curb – all of that wonderful organic material that could be used to recharge your yards just tossed away!  So this is a prime opportunity to discuss the best way to handle your leaf cleanup at the end of the gardening season. I can’t urge you strongly enough not to give your leaves away!  It is a huge waste of natural materials that could benefit your yard! There are a number of really simple environmentally friendly ways to handle your leaf drop that don’t starve your yard and also decrease your impact on municipal services to save $$$.

So what to do with those leaves?

The first method is the lazy man’s way (my favorite) and involves very little raking and effort on your part. Simply run your lawn mower over the leaves where they lie and chop them up into small pieces.  (Yes, I know that using gas mowers are considered an unsustainable gardening practice, but consider the greater good.)  The chopped leaves can stay on your lawn and decompose there. This is an excellent way to help build up the soil. This works best with a mulching mower which is meant to chop materials (you do grass cycle, don’t you?) into fairly small pieces. Do this as needed until the end of the season and the leaves will break down over the winter providing your soil with valuable nutrients. You won’t have to rake a single leaf, and your lawn will thank you for it with improved performance next year.  Check out the video below to see how easy it is.

Another method not quite so effortless is taking those chopped up leaves and mulching your garden beds with them. This will protect your plants from the vagaries of the winter weather and also provide your beds with valuable nutrients when the leaves break down.

If you run out of time (or energy) you can forgo the chopping with the mower and leave the leaves in the beds where they fall and pile on more.  This will accomplish two necessary tasks.  (1) Removing your leaves from any hard surfaces on your property where they can become slick and messy. And (2) removing those leaves from your lawn where they can smother the turf grass.  This also will provide for a neater end of the year appearance.  Research does show that most garden plants in the colder hardiness zones appreciate a nice cover of leaves to protect them, however there are a few that do not so you need to be aware of your specific plant needs.  If you mulch with unchopped leaves, you are also faced with the issue of cleanup in the spring because most leaves will not have decomposed by that time.  If you trees have fine leaves you can probably leave them be in the spring and the appearance will not suffer unduly.  However, many of us are blessed with fine old trees like oaks, maples and sycamores, etc. that have large leaves and for a groomed appearance in your beds in spring you are going to have to remove them.  [I find myself hard at work every spring removing leaves, chopping, and then returning them back into the beds as mulch.  I never said that gardening doesn’t have its chores.]

You can also add your leaves to your compost pile. No matter how small your yard there is always room for a small one tucked away in some out of the way place. The leaves will decompose more quickly if you chop them with your lawn mower as recommended above. Then gather them up (it’s amazing how a large pile of leaves reduces in size) and add them to the pile. If your pile is composed only of chopped leaves, you can make leaf mold for use at a later time. If you have green debris from your garden you can mix the two in layers and let it sit over the winter. Turn the pile when the weather permits and you will eventually have the Black Gold of the garden world – compost.

I tend to use a combination of all these methods.  When it is not too late (or cold) I happily run my lawn mower over piles of leaves that have fallen on the lawn and that I have removed from the beds.  Since raking afterwards is not 100% perfect, some is left on the lawn after I have either blown or raked the chopped product into the beds or put in the compost pile.  However, as the season winds down and I find myself beset with end of the year chores, one of the final acts of the season is that last pass with the lawnmower where I leave the leaves in place.  The yard is then as neat as I can get it before I retreat from the garden and await the first snow.

So I encourage you to avail yourselves of the multifold benefits of leaf hoarding.  Your yard will thank you for it.

by Joanne Mullowney, dedicated leaf hoarder.