Posts

Shred Day Planned for Saturday, November 7th

On Saturday, November 7th from 9 am until 1 pm, the Township will be hosting a Shred Day at the Municipal Complex located at 2 Jake Garzio Drive.

This free event is for Township residents only and provides a safe and secure way to clean out those old checks, bills and any confidential documents that need proper disposal. Materials will not be accepted from businesses and Ewing residents will be required to provide Proof of Residency.

Because this is an extremely popular program please be prepared to spend a few minutes waiting in line. For your safety and the safety of others face masks must be worn, and all citizens will be required to stay in their cars while workers remove your shredding items from your car for you. This event will take place rain or shine.

And the winners are…

Today, after a month of scavenging around town searching for some incredibly unique and creative scarecrows, our 2020 hunt has come to a close and the results of this year’s Green Team’s All-Around Town Scarecrow Scavenger Hunt are in.

But first, thanks go to…

The Scarecrow Committee

The Green Team wishes to thank Mayor Bert Steinmann for his support for this project.  We also owe a debt of thanks to numerous individuals and organizations who helped out with the Hunt this year, including the Ewing Arts Commission and Art Has Not Boundaries.  First, we need to thank the members of the planning committee.  These include Councilwoman Jennifer Keyes-Maloney, Melissa Bennett, Mel Antler, Tim Hoh, Lisa Witt-Pinaire, Ruth Ann Gribbon, Mark Wetherbee, Heidi Furman, Scarecrow event Chairwoman Lisa Feldman, and EGT Chair Joanne Mullowney.  They worked long and hard soliciting scarecrow hosts and working on the clues to help direct you to our ‘crows all around town.

The Prize Donors

In years past for our various scarecrow events we used the proceeds from the annual Garden Tour to fund event prizes.  This year, due to the pandemic, that Tour was cancelled, and we had no proceeds to draw from.  Our thanks go to a number of donors who stepped up to fill that void so that the event could go on.  They include:

  • One very generous donor who wished to remain Anonymous
  • Local Businessman, owner of Money Management Associates and Green Team member Garry Keel
  • Former GT Chair, Peter Boughton
  • Councilwoman Jennifer Keyes-Maloney
  • Councilwoman Sarah Steward
  • Green Team member Donna Morgan
  • Green Team member Heidi Furman
  • Green Team member Caroline Steward
  • Green Team member and Scarecrow Event Chair Lisa Feldman and
  • Green Team member and Chair, Joanne Mullowney

Due to the generosity of the donors we collected more in prize money than we had initially advertised, and prize amounts were subsequently increased.  Each of the People’s Choice, as well as the GT prize, was upped from $100 to $150.  And the Grand Prize for the drawing was upped from $200 to $250.

The Residential People’s Choice

The winner of the People’s Choice in the residential category was:

Plastic Princess

Plastic Princess was created and hosted by Christine Baran at 381 Ewingville Road.

Clue #29

A long time ago, you could hear cows moo, at this “Cross Keys” farm off this road we pass through.

Drive down the road from the school with the name, of the brother of a man, a composer of fame.

All plastic bottles, different types, and sizes. Only using zip ties, fishing line, wire, and PVC pipe for structure.

Ewingville is not only a road, but a section of town formerly known as Cross Keyes.  And George Antheil was a composer related to William Antheil, a local businessman and school board members for whom the school was named.

The Business/Organization Choice

The winner of the People’s Choice in the business/organizational category was:

A Furever Friend

A Furever Friend was created by Olivia Jupillat for EASEL and was hosted at the pavilion behind the municipal building.

Clue #18

In this picnic pavilion, you’ll hear barks a million.

The heads of the scarecrow were crafted from plastic piping and wire mesh. Once the basic heads were formed, the artist used newspapers for a paper mâché technique to create definition and depth for the dog and cat heads. Once that was done, she painted the heads of the dog and cat. The whiskers of the cat and the eyelashes of the dog were created using zip ties. The tongue of the dog was created by using material from a discarded basketball that she found in a creek during a hike. The collars of the dog and cat were created using discarded PVC piping. The overall body was created from scrap wood, an old ironing board, engine parts, wires mesh, plastic mesh, and plastic piping. The body, head and tail were then wrapped in a blanket. The blanket was spray-painted, and parts of the body were also covered in hay.

The Green Team Prize

The Green Team prize was voted upon by the members of the Green Team and was awarded to the entry that best exemplified the creative use of recycled/upcycled materials.

The winner of the Green Team prize was:

Tread

#21 Tread –

Tread was created by Karen Dupee and Bill Stewart and was hosted at 130 Palmer Lane.

Clue #21

Be careful where you dare to tread, this snake will fill you full of dread.

Where does this scary creature reign? It’s at a famous golfer’s lane.

Tread was created from all repurposed tires that were found around town.  The creator also dragged/rolled one tire out from the woods by her house.  They used a garden stake for tongue and feathers for teeth.  They used repurposed Christmas lights that came from a pile of free things in Stockton for eyes that lit up at night.  And, finally, a plastic garden pot for tail.

Drawing Prize Winners

The prizes for the drawing were awarded to the following contestant hunters:

  • Emily Hopkins – $250 Grand Prize
  • Jeff Parsons family – 2nd prize of $100
  • Claudia Aruta & Pat Maske – 3rd prize of $50

Our thanks to all who participated.  It is our sincere hope that you had a great time, learned a bit about our town and its history, while enjoying the creativity displayed by your fellow Ewing citizens and businesses owners.  We look forward to hosting this event again next fall and “seeing” you all at that time, if not before then.

Small Business EE Measures – Surface Technology, Inc.

The New Jersey Commercial and industrial sectors account for 60% of the electricity and 47% of the natural gas usage and their related greenhouse gas emissions.   Small businesses account for over 90% of the businesses in New Jersey. Small businesses can save significantly on the energy use and cost through the NJBPU Clean Energy Direct Install program.  The program can pay up to 80% of the EE upgrade.   See: https://njcleanenergy.com/commercial-industrial/programs/direct-install

Then check out this video to learn how Surface Technology in Ewing has benefitted from Direct Install

Small Office EE – Money Management Associates

There must be thousands of small businesses in New Jersey that are simply office operations.  They are also eligible for the Direct Install program. (Learn about Direct Install at: https://njcleanenergy.com/commercial-industrial/programs/direct-install)  This works best if the business owns their building, but even renters can benefit. If you pay your own utility bill, you will want to talk to your landlord about this program.  Listen to how Gary Keel of Money Management Associates in Ewing took advantage of Direct Install.

This Week: Small Business EE

There are a lot of opportunities for saving money and energy in small business operations.  If you are the owner of a small business or have a favorite small business that you would like to see thrive, this week is for you.

The average commercial enterprise has annual energy usage that amounts to: 74,424 kWh of electricity, costing $9,250 and emitting 39,370 pounds of CO2…. 7,031 therms of natural gas, costing $6,174 and emitting 79,818 pounds of CO2.

The NJ Board of Public Utilities has a Direct Install program that makes it really easy to install energy efficient lighting, upgrade heating and cooling systems, and improve other systems such as refrigeration.

Over the next few days, we will share videos that tell the story of 6 Mercer County Institutions that have used the Direct Install program and couldn’t be happier.

You will find an overview of the program here: